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now, it just looked like a very friendly almost clubby washington event. jokes are told that looked like a lot of comedy. that's what i saw. >> anything wrong with that? >> no, not really. >> talking -- i think the reference they were making was andrea mitchell and al greenspan's wedding that had been held around then. look, they're a power couple. andrea mitchell is a great journalist and alan greenspan is one of the most powerful economic minds and forces in the last few decades. 's an interesting dynamic. had the crossover in the friendship between professional and social life and so forth. >> you write in there for instance, chris dodd, a senator then, now works for the professional picture association he wouldn't lobby. >> he did. now he's head of the most powerful lobbying organizations in washington. what it's emblem mattic of was this fuel class. it sort of described the permanence of washington, the fact that people come here -- they almost always say now a lot of elected officials go on to become lobbyists and consultants and frank is good inside the beltway. >> here's som
of their skin but by the content of their character. i have a dream. >> good morning from washington. it's friday august 23, 2013. i'm chuck todd. this is a special edition of "the daily rundown." we're looking ahead to the 50th anniversary of that famous 1963 march on washington. for many americans, 50 years ago feels like yesterday. but of course for millions of others, including myself who weren't even born yet, in an ironic way, the grand memorial of granite and marble that now stands might make that history feel more distant. particularly for many young people today. we remember dr. king's march as an historical event. through grainy film and archive photos. but for each of us, those four words, "i have a dream," have a different and special renaissanreno sans. since then, every political protest in this country has borrowed from what the leaders of the march on washington for jobs and freedom were able to achieve. tomorrow, thousands will retrace their steps. next week, president obama will mark the 50th anniversary of the march with a speech on the steps of the lincoln memorial. i
to make the first march on washington and i never really got over that until president obama said please lead us in the invocation, and that was in january of this year. thank you reverend sharpton and others for asking me to lend a few words to this most precious gatheri gathering as i look out at the crowd, i find myself saying, what are we doing today? where have we come from? what has been accomplished and where do we go from this point forwa forward? i think of one theme that has been played over and over in the past few months and it's one that bring great controversy. stand your ground. and we can think of standing your ground in the negative, but i ask you today to flip that coin and make stand your ground a positive ring for all of us who believe in freedom and justice and equality, that we stand firm on the ground that we have already made and be sure that nothing is taken away from us because there are efforts to turn back the clock of freedom. and i ask you today will you allow that to happen? take the words "stand your ground" in a positive sense. stand your ground in terms
washington. helping to kick off our special coverage, chris matthews, host of msnbc "hardball" is live in washington, d.c. at the lincoln memorial and where all of today's event will take place. chris, good morning. let's set the scene for everybody. as we understand the program for today, we have three presidents, a host and current and former future civil rights and leaders and politicians taking the stage. truly a diverse program but we all look back 50 years ago to those vivid images that still inspire today. >> thomas, this is going to be a hot day. it's not that hot. it's sweltering today but not as bad as it could get in washington. it's drizzling and may clear up. i expect there is heated rhetoric today. this country is divideded right now, heavily and sharply divided between the one reject an african-american president and rejected him from the day he was elected and the day they heard he might be elected. the other half of the country almost pouting with this illusion right now. gee whiz. why isn't this greater? pef an african-american president and things not happen
'm chris matthews in washington. let me start tonight with this. reince priebus is on the warpath again. the rnc chairman who has made bones trying to suppress african-american votes now has a plan to suppress the free media. having waged war on the 15th amendment, the one that gave african-americans the right to vote, he is now batting down the hatches on a free press. priebus's plan, which he described last night is to take control of the republican nominating process, deciding who will be the moderators of the debates, which debates will be authorized and which networks will be allowed to sponsor them. he, reince priebus will henceforth decide who gets to moderate the debates, where they will be permitted and which networks will be given the privilege of sponsoring them. he reince priebus will decide this big push for personal control is consistent with his oversight of a major republican plan to make it harder for minorities, the elderly and young voters to cast ballots. having loaded people down with more document requirements, voter photo i.d. cards and the rest and few opportunit
. >>> as dawn broke on washington, d.c., 50 years ago today, no one knew what to expect. dr. martin luther king, junior had been up most of the night in his room writing and rewriting the speech he was to give that day, though the most sub lime passage would never appear on that page. the earliest press reports that morning suggested that only about 25,000 people would show up. organizers of the march on washington for jobs and freedom were nervous. putting out fires, working behind the scenes to keep the collision behind the march in tact and preparing to channel the sea of humanity that they hoped to call forth. and then the buses and the trains came, and the people came with them by the thousands. and by that afternoon, more than 200,000 people, black and white spread out before the shadow of the great emancipator, disciplined and skeweding the spirit of solidarity. they listened to speakers one by one who called the nation to meet the demands that justice placed upon it, and about 2:40 in the afternoon, the last speaker rose to the lectern. some fretted the tv cameras would be gone by the t
-perry. live this morning from washington, d.c. where thousands of people turned out to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the march on washington for jobs and freedom yesterday. only one man who spoke from the steps of the lincoln memorial five decades ago remains alive today, congressman john lewis, and he spoke forcefully. >> i got arrested 40 times during the '60s, beaten, left bloody and unconscious. but i'm not tired, i'm not weary. i'm not prepared to sit down and give up. i am ready to fight and continue the fight, and you must fight. >> although the architect of the march has passed away, many of the inequities that prompted the struggle remain firmly in place. in 1963 the march called for equal access to jobs, fair wages, unfettered voting rights and intraracial segregation, access to decent health care, schools, housing. half a century later the struggle continues. the struggle continues for decent work and humane conditions that pays a living wage of the nationwide unemployment rate is 7.4%. for african-americans it's 12.6%. for young african-american men between 20 and 24 the u
night at 9:00 p.m. eastern on c-span programs on every first lady from martha washington to ida mckinley. tonight, sarah polk, mark rhett taylor and abigail fillmore. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] sarah polk was on diplomacy and her strong suit is intelligence and political discussion. >> she made no bones about the fact she took an interest in politics. and that she was her husband's partner. >> she grew naup political household in tennessee. her father was a local politician so she grew up loving politics. she married james after he won a seat in the legislature. because she would not have married him if he had -- >> unfortunately for james k. polk he died three months after leaving the white house. and sarah began a 42-year widowhood. polk place became a shrine to her husband and she would invite anybody who wanted to to come to visit and see the objects she had collected through her long and illustrious political career. >> to live there for many years on her own. during the civil war, generals on both
years ago today, martin luther king junior delivered his legendary dream speech in washington. it was a battle cry for liberty and justice for all. it changed the course of our history. king would have been 84 years old had he lived to this day. he would have been able to witness the nation's first african-american president standing on those same steps he did in 1963. here is president obama commemorating dr. king's dream and his lasting legacy this afternoon. >> on a hot summer day they assembled here in our nation's capital under the shadow of the great emancipator. everyone that realizes what those glorious patriots knew on that day that change does not come from washington but to washington. that change has always been built on our willingness, we, the people, to take on the mantle of citizenship, you are marching. that's the lesson of our past. that's the promise of tomorrow. >> okay, bob, you were particularly moved by this speech as you were by dr. king's speech so many years, 50 years ago. >> yeah. i think if dr. king had been alive today, listened to these tributes,
of dictator throwing thunder bolts out of the sky in washington. he's not. this is a federal system and that means the states are involved. and that's as it should be. and i think more power to him -- or more kudos to had him for wanting to do it that way. some states are participating in the health care markets. some are not. the feds will do it if the states don't. on immigration, there's a role for the states and i think it is going to be an ecpabded role for the states in any kind of reform. on health care, the interesting thing to me is that the business -- a lot of the business community wants obama care to go through. by business community, i mean hospitals, insurers, health care networks, they want more customers. so they went to this republican red state governor and said, you know what? this is pro business. be for it. and she was. >> i think to howard's point, the notion that no good deed goes unpunished. jan brewer is expanding the medical roles which i think is a very good move. there's very little that i think jan brewer does that's good. this is a good thing. low-inco
in washington, d.c., where events are already underway for the 50th anniversary march on washington. thousands of people are gathered here already, with more continuing to stream in. among those scheduled to speak today are martin luther king iii, merly evers williams, the reverend al sharpton, attorney general eric holder, and john lewis. the only person to speak at the original march who is still alive today. here he is in 1963. >> by the forces of our demand, our determination, and our numbers, we shall splinter the segregated south into a thousand pieces and put them together in the image of god and democracy. we must say, wake up, america! wake up! for we cannot stop and we will not and cannot be patient. >> on that day, 50 years ago, 250,000 people gathered here to demand the rights of full citizens. they demanded comprehensive civil rights legislation, school desegregation, full employment, living wages, and the aggressive use of federal authority to ensure economic political and social justice. 50 years later, we have made progress, was the struggle continues for those same demands. we
nbc news in washington, the world's longest-running television show, this is "meet the press." >> good sunday morning. thousands of people gathered here in washington saturday to re-create the march on washington where dr. king gave his famous "i have a dream" speech. and it was exactly 50 years ago today, august 25th, 1963, that dr. king and the executive secretary of the naacp, roy wilkins, appeared right here on "meet the press." many of you either already had the chance or will have the opportunity to see that special program as we have made it -- the original broadcast available to our nbc stations across the country. our roundtable joins us in just a moment. but first joining me now, the only living speaker from the march on washington, congressman john lewis. he spoke yesterday in front of the lincoln memorial. >> you cannot stand by. you cannot sit down. you've got to stand up, speak up, speak out, and get in the way, make some noise! >> congressman lewis, welcome back to "meet the press." >> thank you very much, david, for having me. >> what a moment. we actually have the two
a better time for this march on washington. heather headley has finished singing. here comes the president. [ cheers and applause ] >> to the king family, who have sacrificed and inspired so much, to president clinton, president carter, vice president biden, jill, fellow americans. five decades ago today americans came to this honored place to lay claim to a promise made at our founding. we hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their creator with certain unalienable rights. that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. in 1963, almost 200 years after those words were set to paper, a full century after a great war was fought and emancipation proclaimed, that promise, those truths remained unmet. and so they came by the thousands from every corner of our country, men and women, young and old, blacks who longed for freedom and whites who could no longer accept freedom for themselves while witnessing the subjugation of others. across the land congregations sent them off with food and with prayer. in the middle of the
this country and to mark the 50th anniversary of the march on washington, and the good saturday afternoon to you, everyone. i am craig melvin coming live from the feet of the lincoln memorial continuing our coverage. we heard speech from civil rights and political leaders ranging from attorney general eric holder of course here and house speaker -- house minority leader nancy pelosi and the families of trayvon martin and of course martin luther king iii scheduled to join us at some point here over the next hour or so, and again right now thousands about to start retracing the steps that marchers took 50 years ago. so has peter alexander who is along the march route and let me start with you. what is the scene like right now? >> so right now we're along the route on independence avenue and you can see the police are clearing the way as they arrive here at the martin luther king memorial. we are joined by so many people who witnessed history as we wait to see those who participated in it, one of those voices is the gentleman i met today named franklin delano, no roosevelt, but williams. you
want a friend in washington, get a dog. president obama did so this week with the addition of sunny, another portuguese water dog, companion to bo and one of the few bright spots in the dog days of summer. joining me today, correspondent for "the guardian" anna marie cox and former director of speech writing for the president -- i can't get the words out, i'm so excited, columnist for the daily beast and co-founder of fenway strategies, jon favreau and "washington post" columnist and msnbc political columnist eugene robinson. joining us now is chuck todd who is also, of course, host of msnbc's "the daily rundown." before we get into the actual policy here, i want to talk about the sort of bird's-eye view as far as what the president is doing on this great middle class tour if you will. to me it seems like he's trying to build up as much political capital as possible before he gets back to washington. what do you think he's trying to do? >> i think he's trying to talk about what people around kitchen tables are talking about, right? this has been the great disconnect of washington, s
to politics. i spent a semester in washington with my school, colgate university. i saw washington and i thought, a think tank might be an exciting place to be. i know people don't think of think tanks as being exciting. so the center of american progress was starting up one of my professors gave me a new york magazine article about it. it was new, aggressive, it was a think tank but sort of wasn't your grandmother's think tank. so i decided to apply for an internship at the center for american progress. it was great, it was a lot of fun. it was pushing a progressive agenda like many think tanks haven't been. it was trying to change the message to show that progressives weren't all week on national security. showing religious voters could be progressive. it was trying to change things. >> where has this idea come from in your life? >> my family -- in part because i grew up in a small village in upstate new york under about 1,000 people. i'm adopted. i'm from korea. my siblings are also adopted. my one brother is african-american. the other brother is correia. my parents are white. my fat
. getting ready for the 50th anniversary of the march on washington, "the new york times" website today posted that paper's original coverage, their coverage in the paper from the day that the march happened, back in 1963. and, of course, what's funny about the coverage, looking back on it now. funny/creepy/funny/creepy is how obsessed "the times" was and ow obsessed all of the mainstream media was. how relevant it felt to point out over and over again how nice the whole thing was. this emphasis is out of control. "it was an orderly washington rally." "the leaders of march called on congress with courtesy." "congress responded cordially." "it was an occupying army of marchers on washington, but it was polite." "politeness is the order of the day." "even the traffic control worked smoothly." "disorders were at a minimum." "only four arrested, including a nazi." oh, see, only the nazis were getting arrested. that was a fine day for a walk to the national mall. it is sometimes easier to see in history than it is up close while stuff is happening. but tactics matter in politics. strategy ma
jefferson, lincoln, washington had fought for. the only, i think, two pieces of oratory that would rival it would be fdr's, the only thing we have to fear is fear itself and president kennedy inaugural address. martin luther king joined the founding fathers 50 years ago today. >> reverend al sharpton obviously an important event 50 years ago. 50 years laterer there will be an african-american president going to commemorate this moment. what an extraordinary journey it has been and the journey, as you say every day and as all americans understand, the journey continues. what do you want to hear from the president of the united states today? >> well, i think that what we want to hear is a commitment to continue that journey but to also salute the fact that we have made the journey. we met with him two days ago after having a huge march on saturday about the issues now. and one of the things that i said is that i feel that he should not be compared to dr. king. he is the president. we want to hear from him as the generation before us heard from kennedy about what we are going to do. so i th
at washington. lastwas held hostage december, and i thought i was going to be added to this list. i was lucky after five unpleasant days. i got out. there was a gun battle and a rescue and i managed to escape. i was rescued and escaped. i returned to syria last week for the first time since being kidnapped, and instead of having list, iadded to this have the honor of paying respect to my colleagues who did not make it, and i would like to thank the newseum for that privilege. the question is, why do we do it? why take the risks? is it for fun, ford venture? -- for adventure? is it for the money? there are easier ways to make money than this. like the earth's plates when they snap like violent political change, and we see how the plates are fitting together. we do so the innocents have a voice. we do it because we have decided this is what we want to do with our slice of time on this planet. event back in may. all of the available in our field library at www.c-span.org. looking live at the iwo jima memorial just outside washington based on the photograph by joseph rosenthal in 1945. it was the
>>> good evening, americans, and welcome to "the ed show" live from washington, d.c. it's the last ed show on a saturday. let's get to work. >>> i have a dream today! >> the dream can only be realized if we pay attention to what's going on in our own backyard. >> you've got to stand up, speak up, speak out, and get in the way! make some noise! >> you cannot have economic and political equality without having some form of social equality. >> stand tall in your community, fight for diversity, understand its strength. >> and i don't think our society will rise to its full maturity until we come to see that men are made to live together as brothers. >> 50 years later, we need a team effort to make his dream come true. >> their march is now our march. >> so on the anniversary of the march on washington, our grandchildren will not be fighting the same fight. >> we must give our young people dreams again. >> i have a dream that we shall overcome. >> i stand here today in this sacred place, in my father's footsteps. >> my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will n
indicate military attacks are coming. >>> anniversary of the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. how president obama handles the hopes of the joshua generation. >>> plus as debt and a sense of despair looms large over motown, detroit's next mayor will be former hospital chief mike duggin or the man we'll meet this morning, wayne county sheriff benny napoleon. august 27th, this is "the daily rundown." lets get to my first reads of the morning. secretary of state john kerry laid out an aggressive case for intervention in syria arking evidence of the largest chemical attack in decades is undeniable. the latest escalation with a steady drum beat by the united states and its allies, which is clearly a leadup to military action. >> the killing of women and children and innocent bystanders by chemical weapons is a moral obscenity. president obama has made clear to the outside regime that this international norm cannot be violated without consequences. >> it's an important phrase. you heard it a lot, not just from john kerry but jay carney, international norm, significant, ready for str
on washington from august 1963. martin luther king's "i have a dream" speech. the conservative media in our country, mostly yesterday, tried to pretend that anniversary was not happening. they spent last night complaining bitterly there were no republicans on stage a the 50th anniversary event. republicans weren't invited. today was the day when the conservative media finally bothered to fwogoogle the thing they were complaining about after the fact to realize tons of republicans were invited to be on the stage at the march on washington, it's just that every single one of them said no. the first president bush said no for health reasons. the second president bush said no also presumably for health reasons. jeb bush said no as well, because i don't know. as did john boehner. as did republican house majority leader eric cantor who has been trying to reinvent himself as the republican vaguely friendly toward sieve rights. eric cantor this year marched with john lewis at the re-enactment of the selma march at the edmund pettus bridge. he's been trying to improve his image on civil rights. when
with a predictably defensive editorial by mayor michael bloomberg in the "washington post" in which the mayor took turns defending stop and fricsk and attacking the "washington post," itself, and others were criticizing the practice saying "the men and women who protect our city from criminals and terrorists deserve better than to have their integrity impugned in a courtroom or a newspaper especially when the facts are so clearly on their side." even today speaking at a press conference, touting the largest gun seizure in new york history, both men looked to play up the role of stop and frisk in getting guns off the street. >> wiretap conversations from this investigation show that one of the gun traffickers' biggest concerns was stop, question, frisk. >> campbell didn't want to risk it being found by new york police and is heard saying, "yeah. i'm in charlotte now. i can't take them to my house, to my side of town, in brownsville. we got, like, watchamacallit, stop and frisk. >> mayor bloomberg and commissioner kelly doubling down and repeating the same statements again and again over stop and fr
of another march on washington or at least a commemoration of it. >> well, he might need to deliver some of the same speech that never got heard. dr. king's introduction was in a sense we've come to our nation's capital to cash a check. when the architects of the republic wrote magnificent words of the constitution and declaration of independence, they were signing a promissory note to every american which every prey american would fall heir. and if you look at the constitution as a promissory note for the fulfillment of the unaable rights of all human beings, everything you talk about is the human race. and i think this was never a black march. this was the march and the dream was a dream that made a southern movement a national movement and an international human rights movement all at once. it probably changed from civil rights to human rights. and it included all of the other factions. women were not mentioned in the constitution. gay and lesbian folk were not mentioned in the constitution. all of the immigrant issue was -- well, everybody was an immigrant when the constitution was w
, and his new documentary comes out september 27th. and "the washington post," ezra klein. robert reisch, we're at that time on the calendar again where september 30th we come to the point where we have to come up with a type of legislation to continue funding the government, followed quickly by an increase in the debt ceiling. and of course, as usual, the republican threats are flying. >> well, yes, lawrence, this whale of a fight. it is interesting to conceive of john boehner having a whale of a fight with a president that is not going to negotiate. it is like shadow boxing. and who are you actually going to fight with when the president is not going to negotiate? and the president is actually right in not negotiating. bond markets are already going to be roiled by the feds tapering off the quantitative easing, if you want a chance on that on the federal debt, we'll see the bond markets go crazy, wall street will go crazy, all the republican patriots will come down hard on them as they did the last time. >> i want to play what jay carney said about negotiating on the debt ceiling yesterday
. let's play "hardball." good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. ask yourself, would abraham lincoln be a republican in 2013? would the man sitting up in that chair yesterday be invited to join the party of the birth errs, nullifiers and talkers of succession? just ask yourself in a lineup of ted cruz, rick perry and michele bachmann, and the great emancipator, who would be the odd man out? the reason the republican party wasn't represented yesterday at the king reunion at the lincoln memorial is that the republican party no more longer represents abraham lincoln. its real leader today would be jefferson davis or george wallace or strom thurmond, or some other character in the long list of null fires and obstructionists and states righters. can you imagine the reaction of tom paul had he been alive at the time of the emancipation proclamation? please don't ask. can you imagine to rick perry's claim that texas has the right to succeed from the unionany time it phil feels like it. the values of abraham lincoln, the belief in a strong federal government, the paramount right of h
levels across the country. >>> when lawmakers return to washington from their current august recess. taking center stage of the debate going to be the aid that the u.s. government sends to the egyptian military. >> bob corker is the top republican on the foreign relations committee in the senate, senator, you are a reasonable guy that has tried to strike up political balances in this country, i can only imagine the difficulty of trying to strike a balance. is it possible to have islamists in an egyptian government without them trying to sabotage the whole works? >> they were invited to the table over the course of the last month or so and have not done that. now we're into that cycle of revenge that ends up happening in so many cases in the middle east where people are killed on one side, revenge is taken on the other, there are family members, uncles, aurnts, all ofa sudden the thingests can lates, you have saudi arabia and the uae who have offered $12 million in aid, what they want to see happen is the muslim brotherhood crushed, at the same time, chris, as you and kathleen know,
to revisit the march on washington and the artistic way newtown, connecticut, is moving forward. >>> but first, obama versus putin. clash of the titans. >>> good morning. i'm melissa harris-perry. is it just me or is it feeling a little cold war in here? >> i think we saw more rhetoric on the russian side that was anti-american that played into some of the old stereotypes about the cold war contest between the united states and russia and i've encouraged mr. putin to think forward as opposed to backwards on those issues, with mixed success. >> that was president obama yesterday during a press conference at the white house, capping off a week where the news has been all about u.s./russian relations. on wednesday, the president announced that he would skip a planned one-on-one meeting with russian president vladimir putin. that was scheduled for next month. but the white house said that there has not been enough progress on major issues like nuclear arms and human rights to make a presidential meeting worthwhile. they also cited russia's decision to give asylum to u.s. leaker, edw
right around 3:00 this afternoon on the steps of the u.s. capitol in washington. everybody out! everybody out! time to go! you don't have to go home but you got to live the heck out of here. yes, there was a mass exodus out of washington today as the house of representative s officially adjourned for their august recess this afternoon. and like teenagers on the last day of school, members of congress just bolted for the exits today. once the final bell rang, bye-bye, see you in a month. washington is now heading off for its summer vacation. their august recess. what do you do when you're heading off for vacation? well, don't you tend to take care of a few last-minute things? maybe you run the dishwasher one last time. you take out the trash. you do all of these things in order to put your house in order. before you leave. and you do that so that you're not faced with a big, stinky mess when you get back home. that's what people do when they're heading out for vacation. turns out washington did the same thing. now, contrary to what you may have heard, they actually did get some
. obvious transition here, perhaps. washington state and colorado legalized recreational marijuana use in their states last year. but putting the laws into practice has been anything but smooth sailing. with pot still illegal on a federal level, there are a number of hurdles, including how to regulate the marketplace. cnbc's jane wells with more on the challenges ahead. >> craig, welcome to the mile high city. this is legal medical cannabis. you still can't grow or sell recreational pot yet, but it's coming. in the meantime, no matter how you get your pot, if you got 'em, you can smoke 'em. either here in colorado or in washington state where these pictures were shot. if you're at least 21 years old, only have an ounce but you can't resell it. there's quite a few differences between the two laws. but it turns out nothing has been easy in enacting these new regulations. labeling, tracking, all of that has turned out to be a little more difficult. for example, in washington, they're deciding they're going to cap production so that too much pot isn't grown and it ends up being exported ou
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 284 (some duplicates have been removed)